Mass community cycling events: Who participates and is their behaviour influenced by participation?

Bowles HR, Rissel C: Mass community cycling events: Who participates and is their behaviour influenced by participation? International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Volume 3.

Participation in mass physical activity events may be a novel approach for encouraging inactive or low active adults to trial an active behaviour. The public health applicability of this strategy has not been investigated thoroughly. The purpose of this study to was describe participants in a mass cycling event and examine the subsequent effect on cycling behaviour.

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Deaths of cyclists due to road crashes

2006, Deaths of cyclists due to road crashes: ATSB Road Safety Report, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra

The report gives an overview of the circumstances of road crashes in which cyclists died in the period 1991 to 2005 and provides more detail for 1996 to 2004, the latest period for which detailed data were available.  It examines the incidence of helmet wearing among cyclist deaths, the major factors in fatal crashes involving cyclists and the main crash types. Age and gender distributions, day of week, time of day and speed limit at the crash site are also examined.

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Cycle Safety – A national perspective

2004, Monograph 17 – Cycle Safety: A national perspective. Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.

This monograph provides a statistical overview of the number of cyclists killed or seriously injured on the public road system and a discussion of the available national activity data. It does not include data on cyclists killed and seriously injured in areas outside the public road system.

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Cycling to work in Sydney: analysis of journey-to-work Census data from 1996 and 2001.

Telfer B, Rissel C, 2003, Cycling to work in Sydney: analysis of journey-to-work Census data from 1996 and 2001.

Regular cycling, as with physical activity more generally, has many personal health benefits. In addition, cycling for transport has many environmental and social benefits. These include decreased air pollution and less traffic congestion.  The present analyses were conducted to examine whether there has been an increase in cycling in Sydney between the 1996 and 2001 Census.

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